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:::u.tv:::
30 Apr 2012

Raymond McCord Jnr was murdered in 1997 (Photo: Pacemaker)

Evidence provided by a loyalist supergrass could see a breakthrough in the police hunt for the UVF killers of a former RAF member, a court has heard.

Coroner John Leckey has adjourned inquest proceedings into the 1997 death of 22-year-old Raymond McCord Jnr in north Belfast to see if testimony provided by the so-called “assisting offender” will prompt charges.

On Monday, at a preliminary hearing in Belfast, a police lawyer confirmed that the process of interviewing the offender was near to completion.

It is understood he is providing state’s evidence on a range of crimes committed by the notorious UVF gang from north Belfast’s Mount Vernon estate that beat Mr McCord to death and dumped his body in a Newtownabbey quarry.

A lawyer for the McCord family said this could prompt police action in regard to the murder.

On the back of a complaint by the victim’s father, Raymond McCord Snr, an investigation led by former Police Ombudsman Nuala O’Loan was published in 2007.

Mr McCord Snr has led a high-profile campaign for justice ever since the murder almost 15 years ago.

The report revealed large-scale collusion between the gang and the police, which ran agents inside the UVF.

The PSNI’s Operation Stafford is currently probing crimes committed by the gang.

Earlier this year nine men, including alleged gang leader Mark Haddock, were cleared of murdering UDA chief Tommy English after a lengthy trial which saw evidence provided by two other supergrasses heavily criticised by the judge.

At Monday’s hearing, lawyers for Mr McCord’s parents, who were present in court, told Mr Leckey that they wanted to see the police investigation completed before an inquest was heard.

“There’s an assisting offender who is currently involved in a process with the PSNI,” said Paddy Murray, representing Mr McCord’s mother Vivienne.

“I understand that process is nearing completion, if not completed.

“That process could raise very serious issues. There may well be arising from that a criminal process in the future. We understand that investigation is fairly progressed.”

He said Operation Stafford had raised “very serious and complex issues” in regard to the murder.

“Particularly in relation to state agents’ involvement in the death of Mr McCord,” he said.

“From that point of view, it’s necessary that all information is before the coroner in advance of hearing the inquest.”

Richard Ferguson, representing the PSNI, concurred with Mr Murray’s assessment that the process of taking evidence from the assisting offender was nearing completion.

“It’s a live investigation which there are still potentially very interesting lines of enquiry that are ongoing,” he added.

But the lawyer said the offender was being questioned primarily about another matter related to the wider investigation.

He said it was the general position of the police that they would not wish to see an inquest take place before their investigations were complete, because it may prejudice any potential future court proceedings.

Catherine O’Hanlon, representing Mr McCord Snr, said he also wanted the inquest adjourned but she put on record his disappointment that the police had not made more progress.

“He is extremely disappointed that we are here in this position some 14 and a half years after the death,” she said.

“He feels there has been an inadequate explanation given by the police this morning as to why this investigation hasn’t progressed.”

Mr Leckey, Northern Ireland’s senior coroner, said that decades ago the police seemed to be content to let inquests take place before any police investigation but there had been a “sea change” in their attitude.

He noted the potential issue around prejudice but indicated that he did not want to delay inquest proceedings indefinitely, noting that criminal charges may never be brought.

“The problem of course is that may never be achieved and sadly there are a number of deaths where that hasn’t be achieved,” he said.

He said the longer an inquest was delayed, the more risk of the “trail going cold”.

Mr Leckey said he would adjourn proceedings until 7 September, when he hoped the police would be in a position to outline the situation in more clarity.

The police would have to formally apply for an open-ended adjournment until their investigation is complete.

Mr Leckey asked that the senior PSNI detective leading the investigation – Tim Hanley – be present in court for September’s hearing.

By Paul Higgins
Belfast Telegraph
Saturday, 4 February 2012

A one-time “enforcer” in the LVF, formerly charged with murdering a journalist, has been jailed for three years for his involvement in a catalogue of crimes.

Jailing 32-year-old Neil Hyde at Belfast Crown Court, Judge Patrick Lynch QC told him that had he not agreed to identify the alleged culprits in the murder of Sunday World investigative reporter Martin O’Hagan, and give evidence about the activities of the outlawed LVF, he would have jailed him for 18 years.

He told Hyde that having been recruited into the LVF in 1996, “by virtue of your size and propensity for violence, it appears that you were useful to the organisation as an enforcer and embarked on a career of sustained criminality over the next 15 years”.

Among the 48 charges which Hyde pleaded guilty to — having signed a contract under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act to get a massively reduced sentence in exchange for his testimony — are possessing handguns with intent to endanger life, withholding information about terrorist attacks, robbery, aggravated burglary and drug-running offences, all committed between January 1992 and January 2008.

Count 24, of conspiring with Drew King and others to possess a handgun on September 28, 2001, relates to the murder of 51-year-old journalist and father-of-two Mr O’Hagan, who was gunned down in front of his wife near his Lurgan home.

Outside the court, editor of the Sunday World and close friend of Mr O’Hagan, Jim McDowell, said the result was “a start”. “I want the police now to go and get the people, the real LVF killers and drug dealers who murdered my colleague,” he said.

BBC
31 Jan 2012

Almost five months after it opened, the judge at the UVF supergrass trial in Belfast has retired to consider his verdict.

At 71 days the trial is one of the longest and most expensive in Northern Ireland’s legal history.

It relied on the the evidence of two so-called supergrasses, brothers Robert and Ian Stewart.

Thirteen men are charged with more than 30 offences including murder, kidnapping, and UVF membership.

They include the alleged former UVF leader in north Belfast Mark Haddock.

Last week a 14th defendant, David Jason Smart, 38, from Milewater Close, Newtownabbey, was freed from the dock after the court heard that the prosecution were not challenging the judge’s ruling that he had no case to answer.

They also did not challenge the judge’s decision to acquit several others of involvement in two punishment beatings.

However, at the time Mr Justice Gillen said his finding on those charges did not apply to the evidence of the Stewart brothers relating to the murder of UDA man Tommy English in Newtownabbey, another punishment beating and to the allegations of UVF membership.

Accused of Mr English’s murder along with Mark Haddock are David Miller, 40; Alex Wood, 35, John Bond, 45, Darren Moore, 42, Ronald Bowe, 35, Samuel Higgins, 35, Jason Loughlin, 36, and Philip Laffin, 34.

They also face other charges including UVF membership, wounding, possessing guns and hijacking.

The four who deny offences such as assisting offenders and perverting justice are William Hinds, 46, David McCrum, 32, Mark Thompson, 37, and Neil Pollock, 36.

The trial began last September.

Much of it has been taken up by the testimonies of Robert Stewart and his brother Ian.

They have admitted UVF membership, and already served more than three years for their part in the murder of Mr English on Halloween night 2000.

He was shot dead in front of his wife and children at his home on the Ballyduff estate at the height of a loyalist feud between the UVF and UDA.

Under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act, the Stewarts have signed an agreement committing them to giving truthful evidence about the men in the dock.

In such cases, so-called “assisting offenders” can have their sentences reduced in return.

In the case of the Stewart brothers, both have avoided the prospect of a further 19 years in jail, providing they are seen to have kept the agreement.

They handed themselves in to police in August 2008, and underwent more than 330 police interviews in total, some of them at secret addresses outside Northern Ireland.

In court on Tuesday a barrister argued that their lives had been characterised by “deceit, self-interest and gratuitous violence.”

This is a diplock trial, meaning the Mr Justice Gillen acts as both Judge and Jury.

He told the court he would deliver his judgement as soon as possible.

The outcome of the trial is of importance to the Historical Enquiries Team of the Police Service of Northern Ireland, and the Public Prosecution Service, which is said to be considering other prosecutions using assisting offenders.

BBC
24 Jan 2012

The accused men at the centre of a UVF supergrass trial in Belfast will not give evidence on their own behalf.

They deny a series of charges made on the word of brothers Robert and Ian Stewart.

The Crown Court trial of 14 men, includes alleged former UVF leader in north Belfast, Mark Haddock.

In Belfast on Tuesday, lawyers revealed that the accused would not be taking the witness box in their own defence.

The judge asked if the defendants were aware that the court “may draw such inference as it deems proper”.

The defence lawyers in turn informed the judge that they had advised their clients as to the implications,

Although the 13 remaining accused are not giving evidence, one of them, Ronald Trevor Bowe, will be calling a doctor to give medical evidence on Wednesday.

One defendant David Jason Smart, 38, from Milewater Close, Newtownabbey, was freed from the dock after the court heard that the prosecution were not challenging the judge’s ruling that he had no case to answer.

The prosecution are also not challenging the judge’s decision to acquit several others of involvement in two punishment beatings.

However, at the time Mr Justice Gillen said his finding on those charges did not apply to the evidence of the Stewart brothers relating to the murder of UDA man Tommy English in Newtownabbey and to another punishment beating and to the allegations of UVF membership.

Accused of Mr English’s murder along with Mark Haddock are David Miller, 40; Alex Wood, 35, John Bond, 45, Darren Moore, 42, Ronald Bowe, 35, Samuel Higgins, 35, Jason Loughlin, 36, and Philip Laffin, 34.

They also face charges such as UVF membership, wounding, possessing guns and hijacking.

The four who deny offences such as assisting offenders and perverting justice are William Hinds, 46, David McCrum, 32, Mark Thompson, 37, and Neil Pollock, 36.

The trial which is one of the biggest and most expensive criminal trials in Northern Irish legal history began last September.

Much of it has been taken up by the testimonies of Robert Stewart and his brother Ian. They have admitted UVF membership, and already served more than three years for their part in the murder of Mr English on Halloween night 2000.

He was shot dead in front of his wife and children at his home on the Ballyduff estate+ at the height of a loyalist feud between the UVF and UDA.

Under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act, the Stewarts have signed an agreement committing them to giving truthful evidence about the men in the dock.

In such cases, so-called “assisting offenders” can have their sentences reduced in return.

In the case of the Stewart brothers, both have avoided the prospect of a further 19 years in jail, providing they are seen to have kept the agreement.

They handed themselves in to police in August 2008, and underwent more than 330 police interviews in total, some of them at secret addresses outside Northern Ireland.

:::u.tv:::
20 Jan 2012

A judge has refused to halt the long-running of trial of 14 men implicated in a series of UVF terrorist crimes by two supergrass brothers.

But he has thrown out a number of charges against some of the accused because the evidence against them was ‘weak’.

Mark Haddock

Lawyers for the accused had urged Mr Justice Gillen to acquit all the men on all of the charges because they said the unsupported evidence of brothers Robert and Ian Stewart was totally and completely unworthy of belief.

They argued that based on the inconsistencies of the brothers’ evidence the judge could never be convinced of the guilt of the men who between them face a total of 37 charges ranging from the murder of UDA leader Tommy English to causing grievous bodily harm to men in punishment beatings.

Other charges include UVF membership and assisting offenders.

In a 35 minute ruling at Belfast Crown Court on Friday morning Mr Justice Gillen said he was acquitting the defendants on charges relating to two of the punishment beatings.

He said the evidence was so weak that there were no circumstances in which he could convict the accused in the two cases.

He said the passage of time had led to a ‘flawed and confused recollection of the incidents’ by the brothers.

The judge also said the two brothers had been involved ‘in a plethora of terrorist incidents’ and there was a danger that they were confusing a number of the episodes.

Mr Justice Gillen said John Bond, one of the accused who was implicated in a beating, was actually in prison at the time of the incident, but the judge said his findings about the Stewarts’ evidence didn’t apply at this stage to the charges relating to the English murder and to another punishment beating and to the allegations of UVF membership.

Friday’s ruling left only of the accused – David Smart – acquitted of all the charges against him but he will be back in the dock on Tuesday 24 January when prosecution lawyers will reveal whether or not they are going to appeal against the decision which Mr Justice Gillen made on Friday.

Accused of Mr English’s killing are 41-year-old Mark Haddock from the Mount Vernon area of north Belfast; his alleged UVF second-in-command 38-year-old David ‘Reggie’ Millar and the alleged commander of the New Mossley UVF Alex ‘Poco’ Wood and his suspected lieutenant Jason Loughlin, both aged 34.

The nine men who deny the murder of rival UDA chief Tommy Emglish in October 2000 and UVF membership, possessing guns and hijacking are: Mark Haddock (41) with an address as c/o maghaberry prison, John Bond (43) from Essex Court, Carrick, Ronald Bowe (33) from Ross House in the Mount Vernon estate, Samuel Higgins (34) from The Meadow, Antrim, Philip Laffin (33) from Bridge Street, Antrim, Jason Loughlin (34) from Bryson Court, Newtownabbey, David Miller (38) from Upritchard Court, Bangor, Darren Moore (40) from Mount Vernon Park, Alexander Wood (34) from Milewater Way, Newtownabbey.

The five men who deny offences such as assisting offenders and perverting justice are: William Hinds (45) from Ballycraigy Gardens, Newtownabbey, David McCrum (31) from Beechgrove Drive, Newtownabbey, Neil Pollock (34) from Fortwilliam Gardens, Belfast, David Smart (36) from Milewater Close, Newtownabbey, Mark Thompson (35) from Ballyvesey green, Newtownabbey.

BBC
20 Jan 2012

The judge in the UVF Supergrass trial in Belfast has thrown out some of the charges in the case.

It involves charges against ten of the 14 men in the dock.

Mr Justice Gillen said he “could not conceivably be satisfied of the guilt of the accused” in the cases of two serious beatings in 1996.

He said he believed the principal witnesses had flawed memories of the events and may have been mixing up several different beatings.

Much of the trial has been taken up by the testimonies of Robert Stewart and his brother Ian.

They have admitted UVF membership, and already served more than three years for their part in the murder of the Mr English on Halloween night 2000.

Mr English was shot dead in front of his wife and children at his home on the Ballyduff estate at the height of a loyalist feud between the UVF and UDA.

On Friday, Mr Justice Gillen said John Bond, one of the accused who was implicated in a beating, was actually in prison at the time of the incident.

The prosecution has indicated it will appeal against his decision.

Nine of the ten face other charges.

If the prosecution appeal fails, one of the 14 accused, David Smart would have no other charges against him and could be discharged.

The Judge will continue the case concerning the murder of UDA man Tommy English in 2000, UVF membership and other matters.

The trial began in early September 2011 and is one of the biggest and most expensive criminal trials in Northern Irish legal history.

All of the 14 men accused deny all the charges against them.

Under legislation called the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act, the Stewarts have signed an agreement committing them to giving truthful evidence about the men in the dock.

In such cases, so-called “assisting offenders” can have their sentences reduced in return.

In the case of the Stewart brothers, both have avoided the prospect of a further 19 years in jail, providing they are seen to have kept the agreement.

They handed themselves in to police in August 2008, and underwent more than 330 police interviews in total, some of them at secret addresses outside Northern Ireland.

Belfast Telegraph
18 January 2012

The UVF supergrass trial has made history for a second time after the judge proposed that legal arguments by lawyers should be published on the internet.

In a unique bid to ensure proper access to the judicial process, Mr Justice Gillen said that, with the agreement of counsel, their written submissions should be freely available online for members of the public to read. Any resulting judgments or rulings should also be published, the judge said.

He explained while these skeleton arguments were considered by the court, they were not always opened publicly during proceedings.

At the beginning of the non-jury trial last September, Mr Justice Gillen initially granted permission for the case to be “tweeted” on social media website Twitter.

He is presiding over a marathon case of 14 defendants implicated in a catalogue of UVF terror crimes. Nine of the accused are charged with the 2000 murder of rival UDA chief Tommy English.

:::u.tv:::
9 Jan 2012

A man who at one stage claimed he was beaten by alleged UVF commander Mark Haddock and other alleged terrorists later admitted that his evidence was “unreliable”.

Chronic alcoholic and drug addict Keith Caskey was speaking at the Belfast Crown Court trial on Monday.

He alleged that Haddock, Darren Moore and Alex Wood picked him up in a car in January 1996 before taking him to a New Mossley flat where Philip Laffin and David Smart were waiting.

The men bundled him into an alleyway, he said, where he was severely beaten and had a pillow case pulled down over his head.

Mr Casey added that Haddock told him he was going to take it off but not to look until they had all left – he said he waited a while before opening his eyes but that when he did, Haddock was still there and he hit him on the head with a hammer.

However under cross-examination from Haddock’s defence QC Frank O’Donoghue, Mr Caskey later admitted he could not remember the incident and had signed a statement handed to him by the Historical Enquiries Team who had also given him a total of £200.

Admitting that he had been a heavy drinker from the age of 12, Mr Caskey said that at the time of the incident he was downing two bottles of vodka a day along with cannabis, ecstasy, “speed, acid, anything I could get my hands on”.

He also admitted that he told police at the time that he had been attacked in Manse Rise forest by five masked men.

Mr Caskey told the lawyer: “I’m not reliable here at all.

“If they go down on my evidence that would be wrong because I’m not 100% sure at all.”

He freely admitted he had a 14-page criminal record and told the court that given the fact he was involved in “anti-social behaviour, that’s [punishment beatings] what happens and I was happy enough with that”.

Mr O’Donoghue asked him if he was agreeing to prompts by officers from the HET and Mr Caskey agreed that “to be honest I was just going along with them”.

Nine men – including Haddock, Moore and Wood – deny the murder of rival UDA chief Tommy English in October 2000, UVF membership and numerous other offences such as wounding with intent, possessing guns and hijacking.

The trial continues.

BBC
9 Jan 2012

A witness at the UVF Supergrass trial in Belfast has claimed detectives from the Historical Enquiries Team (HET) twice paid him money after he made statements about some of the accused.

Keith Caskey, 41, received a severe beating in New Mossley.

It happened in January 1996.

He was designated a hostile witness by the trial judge, Mr Justice Gillen, because there were two distinct versions of his story.

In one version, which agrees with his statement to the HET, Mr Caskey said he was driven by three of the accused, Mark Haddock, Darren Moore and Alec Wood to New Mossley, expecting to receive a punishment beating for antisocial behaviour.

He claimed, in his evidence for the prosecution, that he also saw two others, David Smart and Philip Laffin.

He testified that he was taken to a nearby alleyway, his head covered with a pillow case, and he was then beaten by six men wielding baseball bats, pickaxe handles and hammers.

He received multiple injuries to his legs, arms and head and was in hospital for several weeks, and used a wheelchair for some time afterwards.

But when cross examined by defence barristers, Mr Caskey insisted that the HET had written the first statement for him and he had simply signed it.

He insisted he had no memory of the incident at all, and certainly could not remember the identity of any of his attackers.

He further alleged that an HET detective had given him £50 on two separate occasions.

The court heard that Mr Caskey had been an alcoholic and drug addict for several years, was still a heroin user, and that he had no confidence in his own memory.

He stated that he had no wish to give evidence and went as far as to tell the court “I’m not reliable here at all”.

The trial began in early September 2011, and is expected to finish hearing evidence on Tuesday.

It is one of the biggest and most expensive criminal trials in Northern Irish legal history.

All of the 14 men accused deny all the charges against them.

Much of the trial has been taken up by the testimonies of Robert Stewart and his brother Ian. They have admitted UVF membership, and already served more than three years for their part in the murder of the UDA man Tommy English on Halloween night 2000.

Mr English was shot dead in front of his wife and children at his home on the Ballyduff estate at the height of a loyalist feud between the UVF and UDA.

Under legislation called the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act, the Stewarts have signed an agreement committing them to giving truthful evidence about the men in the dock.

In such cases, so-called “assisting offenders” can have their sentences reduced in return.

In the case of the Stewart brothers, both have avoided the prospect of a further 19 years in jail, providing they are seen to have kept the agreement.

They handed themselves in to police in August 2008, and underwent more than 330 police interviews in total, some of them at secret addresses outside Northern Ireland.

Belfast Telegraph
21 December 2011

After seven weeks in the witness box, so-called supergrass Ian Stewart ended his evidence yesterday by telling Diplock judge Mr Justice Gillen in the loyalist UVF terror trial that he and his brother knew nothing about any deals to be had with the authorities.

Stewart claimed that it came as a “complete surprise” when he and his brother Robert learned they could get a reduced life sentence for their involvement in the murder of UDA rival Tommy English in October 2000.

The elder of the Stewart brothers, who has become a Catholic, also claimed it was not until they were sentenced a year ago this month that they were told the amount of that reduction.

As it turned out, they only had to serve a minimum of three years of their life terms.

From the start of the marathon Belfast Crown Court non-jury trial, which began on September 6, they implicated 14 men, including alleged UVF commander and Special Branch agent Mark Haddock, in a catalogue of their UVF crimes.

Among the 37 charges faced by some of the accused is the murder of Mr English.

He was shot dead at the height of a feud within loyalism, and killed simply because he was a member of the UVF’s rival terror group, the UDA.

The brothers also gave evidence about attacks on three men who had run foul of the UVF, including a man suspected of being a paedophile.

The court heard one of their victims received a beating described by Robert Stewart as “one of the worst they (his UVF unit) had ever handed out”.

It is expected that the trial will be adjourned today following legal arguments and will resume again in the new year.

By Will Leitch
BBC

One of the biggest and most expensive criminal trials in Northern Irish legal history has adjourned for Christmas.

The Crown Court trial of 14 men, including the alleged special branch spy and alleged former UVF leader in north Belfast, Mark Haddock, will now resume in the New Year.

The defendants are implicated on the word of two men, brothers Robert and Ian Stewart.

All the 14 men accused deny all the charges against them.

Robert Stewart and his brother Ian have admitted UVF membership, and already served more than three years for their part in the murder of the UDA man Tommy English on Halloween night 2000.

Mr English was shot dead in front of his wife and children at his home on the Ballyduff estate at the height of a Loyalist feud between the UVF and UDA.

The Stewarts have given evidence and undergone weeks of sustained cross-examination by defence barristers.

Under legislation called the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act, they have signed an agreement committing them to giving truthful evidence about the men in the dock.

In such cases, so-called “assisting offenders” can have their sentences reduced in return.

In the case of the Stewart brothers, both have avoided the prospect of a further 19 years in jail, providing they are seen to have kept the agreement.

They handed themselves in to police in August 2008, and underwent more than 330 police interviews in total, some of them at secret addresses outside Northern Ireland.

The trial began on 6 September.

BBC
8 Dec 2011

The judge and lawyers in the UVF supergrass trial visited the area around the Newtownabbey home of murdered UDA leader Tommy English on Friday.

The Belfast Crown Court hearing was adjourned to reconvene in New Mossley.

This was where the murder was allegedly planned according to brothers Ian and Robert Stewart.

The judge and lawyers also visited Ballyduff where Mr English was shot dead in October 2000.

The Stewart brothers claim that before the shooting, alleged former north Belfast UVF leader Mark Haddock and another accused, Darren Moore, were driven on a scouting expedition before UVF gunmen were deployed to assassinate Mr English.

It is understood that the purpose behind Friday’s visit was to enable the judge and lawyers to familiarise themselves with the loyalist area which has featured heavily in the trial to date.

The Stewart brothers claim that the murder was planned in a flat in New Mossley in retaliation for the shooting of UVF associate Bertie Rice at the height of the then loyalist feud.

Haddock, 41, allegedly ordered the murder of a UDA member.

Meanwhile on Friday, defence QC Arthur Harvey, acting on behalf of Alexander Wood, has continued his cross examination of Ian Stewart, the second of the supergrass brothers to give evidence before the trial.

Stewart and his brother Robert received three-year sentences for involvement in the murder of Mr English.

They are testifying against the 14 men in return for their reduced sentences.

The trial continues.

BBC
6 Dec 2011

One of the key witnesses at the UVF supergrass trial in Belfast has denied trying to get a reduced sentence from the moment he gave himself up.

Ian Stewart said he and his brother Robert simply wanted to make a clean breast of it, and expected to be given life sentences for the murder of Tommy English in 2000.

They served just over three years in prison instead of 22.

They are testifying against 14 men in return for their reduced sentences.

Ian Stewart told the court it only dawned on him that this lesser sentence might be available to him more than two months after his arrest.

He repeated the claim when Mr Justice Gillen questioned him further about it.

But defence barrister Arthur Harvey QC produced documents to show that Stewart had requested a meeting with the Historical Enquiries Team hours after his arrest in 2008, and when it took place a few days later the potential deal was explained in detail.

On Tuesday, Stewart claimed in Belfast Crown Court that he simply does not remember this much earlier meeting.

The defence claim the discrepancy sheds doubt on his motives for testifying against 14 men, including alleged former north Belfast UVF leader Mark Haddock.

Stewart and his brother Robert received three-year sentences for involvement in the murder of UDA leader Tommy English.

They are testifying against the 14 men in return for their reduced sentences.

The trial continues.

Bobby Sands mural photo
Ní neart go cur le chéile

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